Technical Questions | SIC-Performance

How Fuel Injection Systems Work

August 27, 2015 | Technical Questions | Blove-si | No comments

In trying to keep up with emissions and fuel efficiency laws, the fuel system used in modern cars has changed a lot over the years. The 1990 Subaru Justy was the last car sold in the United States to have a carburetor; the following model year, the Justy had fuel injection. But fuel injection has been around since the 1950s, and electronic fuel injection was used widely on European cars starting around 1980. Now, all cars sold in the United States have fuel injection systems.
In this article, we’ll learn how the fuel gets into the cylinder of the engi­ne, and what terms like “multi-port fuel injection” and “throttle body fuel injection” mean.


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Fuel Line Size vs. Pressure Drop

August 26, 2015 | Technical Questions | Blove-si | No comments

It is important to understand the relationship between fuel line size and fuel pressure when planning a fuel delivery system. Fuel systems can be incorrectly designed if the pressure loss attributed to the length of the fuel lines isn’t taken into account. Excessive pressure drop in the fuel lines feeding a carburetor or EFI system will inhibit their proper function, and in the case of a bypass or return style regulator, excessive pressure drop through a return line will squelch the regulator’s ability to operate correctly. To deliver fuel at the correct flow rate and pressure, careful consideration of fuel line diameter and length, as well as whether the application is carbureted or EFI, is very important.


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How to remove broken bolts studs

August 25, 2015 | Technical Questions | Blove-si | No comments

Remove broken bolts studs – It never fails! Just when you think you have got the whole job taken apart and everything under control you either twist off a nut, break or round off a screw, or strip out the threads entirely. This can often be a frustrating time-waster with no quick fix available. More often than not, removing the broken piece and/or repairing the broken threads can take longer than all the whole job itself.


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Engine Noises | Knocking and Ticking | Common Causes

August 24, 2015 | Technical Questions | Blove-si | No comments

Misdiagnosis is the norm rather than the exception. Diagnosing Engine Noises can be the most difficult thing a mechanic can do.


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Engine Problems

So you go out one morning and your engine will turn over but it won’t start… What could be wrong? Now that you know how an engine works, you can understand the basic things that can keep an engine from running. Three fundamental things can happen: a bad fuel mix, lack of compression or lack of spark. Beyond that, thousands of minor things can create problems, but these are the “big three.” Based on the simple engine we have been discussing, here is a quick rundown on how these problems affect your engine:


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DIAGNOSING SERPENTINE BELT PROBLEMS

Serpentine belt problems usually result from one of three causes: a defective belt tensioner; misalignment of a pulley; or, defective bearings in the tensioner, idler, or one of accessories driven by the belt (including the water pump).

Fortunately, the belt can help you diagnose the problem, both before you remove it and afterward:

Squealing sound: Belt slipping
Chirping sound: Misalignment of an accessory drive pulley
Frayed belt edge: Misalignment of an accessory drive pulley
Polished belt edges: Belt slipping
Glazed belt grooves: Belt slipping
Fluid contamination: Oil, power steering, or coolant leak
Excessive cracking: Other than severe old age, defective tensioner
Whirring sound: defective bearing in tensioner pulley or idler pulley
Rhythmic noises occurring at engine speed: Delaminating belt backing, chunking of belt ridges, or foreign object embedded in belt groove
Grinding sound: damaged bearings in driven accessory
Belt coming off: Pulley misalignment, belt misalignment on pulley, defective tensioner, or bearing wear in tensioner, idler or driven accessories


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Learn what can go wrong with engines

Doing regular engine maintenance can help you avoid future repairs.

Engine Problems

So you go out one morning and your engine will turn over but it won’t start… What could be wrong? Now that you know how an engine works, you can understand the basic things that can keep an engine from running. Three fundamental things can happen: a bad fuel mix, lack of compression or lack of spark. Beyond that, thousands of minor things can create problems, but these are the “big three.” Based on the simple engine we have been discussing, here is a quick rundown on how these problems affect your engine:


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Introduction to How Car Engines Work

Have you ever opened the hood of your car and wondered what was going on in there? A car engine can look like a big confusing jumble of metal, tubes and wires to the uninitiated.

You might want to know what’s going on simply out of curiosity. Or perhaps you are buying a new car, and you hear things like “3.0 liter V-6” and “dual overhead cams” and “tuned port-fuel injection.” What does all ­of that mean?


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How does a carburetor work?

If you have read the page entitled How Car Engines Work, you know that the idea behind an engine is to burn gasoline to create pressure, and then to turn the ­pressure into motion. A remarkably tiny amount of gasoline is needed during each combustion cycle. Something on the order of 10 milligrams of gasoline per combustion stroke is all it takes!

T­he goal of a carburetor is to mix just the right amount of gasoline with air so that the engine runs properly. If there is not enough fuel mixed with the air, the engine “runs lean” and either will not run or potentially damages the engine. If there is too much fuel mixed with the air, the engine “runs rich” and either will not run (it floods), runs very smoky, runs poorly (bogs down, stalls easily), or at the very least wastes fuel. The carb is in charge of getting the mixture just right.


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Why Alignment Angles Change

An alignment angle doesn’t change randomly. There is a cause-and-effect relationship between external and ­internal forces that can alter the geometry of a vehicle’s suspension. Having the alignment reading for only one angle on one corner is just like having the outside temperature without knowing if there is a tornado outside.
Just making an adjustment and not asking why the adjustment was needed can lead to a comeback. Knowing why the adjustment is required is critical to performing the total alignment.

Loads in the rear of the vehicle can cause changes to caster and camber. The camber and caster will become positive in the front, and if the vehicle has an independent rear suspension, the camber will become negative and it will be toed out. This could lead to outside edge wear in the front and inside edge wear in the rear.


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